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Return to: A Case Study of Academic Misconduct, Peer Review Failures and Journal Coverups of Published Errors


   

Table 3. Autoplagiarism: Two Example Passages From Three of Douglas Allchin's Publications on Helmont.

Example Passage 1
Allchin (1993) - Cornell University:

"He claims, for instance, that students can understand how van Helmont performed the "wrong" experiment. To assess his hypothesis about the role of water, he should have grown the willow hydroponically - that is, by water alone. And he should have used distilled water, so as to exclude the role of minerals in the water."
Allchin (1995) - University of Texas at El Paso:

"He claims, for instance, that students can understand how van Helmont performed the "wrong" experiment. To assess his hypothesis about the role of water, he should have grown the willow hydroponically - that is, in water alone. And he should have used distilled water, so as to exclude the role of minerals in the water."
Allchin (2000) - University of Minnesota:

"He claimed, for instance, that students can understand how van Helmont performed the wrong experiment. To assess his hypothesis about the role of water, he should have grown the willow hydroponically - that is, in water alone. And he should have used distilled water to exclude the role of minerals in the water."
Example Passage 2
Allchin (1993) - Cornell University:

"Concerns about distilled water in the context of an experiment done centuries before anyone understood the concept seem slightly misplaced. More deeply, van Helmont was probably well aware that plants do not grow outside soil. He even buried the pot in the earth, as if the location was a significant parameter not to disturb. That is, in our framework, he included it among the "controlled" conditions. There was certainly no existing evidence to suggest that the substrate of the soil was not relevant in some respect."
Allchin (1995) - University of Texas at El Paso:

"Concerns about distilled water in the context of an experiment done centuries before anyone understood the concept are grossly misplaced and distort the process of science. Van Helmont was also probably well aware that plants do not grow outside soil. He even buried his pot in the earth, as if the location was a significant parameter to keep constant. There was certainly no existing evidence then to suggest that the substrate of soil was not relevant in some respect."
Allchin (2000) - University of Minnesota:

"Concerns about distilled water in the context of an experiment done centuries before anyone understood the concept are grossly misplaced. Van Helmont was also probably well aware that plants do not grow outside soil. He even buried his pot in the earth, as if the location was a significant parameter to keep constant. There was certainly no existing evidence then to suggest that the substrate of soil was not relevant in some respect."

Literature

  • Allchin, D. (1993). Reassessing van Helmont, reassessing history. BioScene: Journal of College Biology Teaching 19(2):3-5.

  • Allchin, D. (1995). How not to teach history in science. in F. Finley, D. Allchin, D. Rhees and S. Fifield (eds.), Proceedings, Third International History, Philosophy and Science Teaching Conference, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 1, 13-22.

  • Allchin, D. (2000). How not to teach historical cases in science. Journal of College Science Teaching. 30:33-37.

  • Allchin, D. 2002. How not to teach history in science. The Pantaneto Forum. July. (This is a slightly different, online-only version of Allchin 2000).